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"Quills" At The  Regus London Film Festival


Click on pic for full coverage of Kate at the premiere
or use the links below!

Links to premiere news:

Nov 6: BBC Radio
Nov 6: BBC News
Nov 4: Sky News
Nov 4: The Sun
Nov 4: ITN News
Nov 4: Yahoo! News
Nov 4: UK Times
Nov 3: Ananova story
Nov 3: Empire Online
has a story and pics of the Quills premiere

Nov 3: Yahoo! Photos has two pics from the premiere!

Links to News:

Nov 2: Empire Online is devoting space to coverage of the festival, and features a pic of Kate as Madeleine on their London FF page.

Oct 31: BBC News  previews the festival

Oct 6: The official festival site has been updated, and the program has been added. GO!

iF Magazine reports on the festival (Sept 14)

Empire Online ("London Festival Rocks"-Sept. 13)

BBC News ("Film Frenzy at London Festival"-Sept. 13)

Ananova ("London Film Festival Screening List Unveiled"-Sept. 13)

This is London ("More Stars For London's Festival"-Sept. 13)

Yahoo! News ("London Film Festival Screening List Unveiled"-Sept. 14)

November 2: From the UK Independent:
    While the LFF still cannot boast the international kudos or glamour of Cannes or Venice, its eclectic selection of new films this year - the largest in the history of the festival - has caused a buzz in the capital.
    Between last night's rock'n' roll movie from Cameron Crowe and the closing British film Born Romantic in two weeks time from writer director David Kane, also set in the world of music and dance, the mix includes Woody Allen's Small Time Crooks with Hugh Grant, Mamet's State And Main with Alec Baldwin, and Quills, a film about the Marquis de Sade with Geoffrey Rush, Kate Winslet and Michael Caine.

October 31: BBC News lists Quills as one of the highlights of the London Film Festival:
The 44th Regus London Film Festival (LFF) opens on 1 November with almost 200 feature films from all over the world on show. BBC News Online helps make choosing what to see a little easier with a pick of some of this year's festival highlights.
Quills is a sumptuous, thought-provoking period drama about the life and work of the Marquis de Sade. Star attraction comes from Kate Winslet, Joaquin Phoenix and Sir Michael Caine.

October 8: The Observer named Quills one of the highlights of the festival:
Phillip Kaufman's erotic-themed Quills continues the director's interest in libidinous topics - The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Henry & June - chronicling the Marquis de Sade's incarceration. It boasts a fine cast: Geoffrey Rush, Michael Caine, Kate Winslet and Joaquin Phoenix.


The program for the 44th London Film Festival was announced on September 13, 2000.

Excerpt from Empire Online:
    The programme for this year's Regus London Film Festival was unveiled in London this morning and director Adrian Wootton made it clear that the 44th festival would be the biggest and best yet. With a new sponsor on board, this year's festival, which runs from 1 to 16 November, will screen no fewer than 196 movies - beginning with Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous.
    Six other gala screenings will follow, including the Royal Charity Premiere of Into the Arms of Strangers, Quills with Kate Winslet and Geoffrey Rush, James Gray's The Yards, Bruce Paltrow's Duets, David Mamet's State and Main, Gurinder Chadha's What's Cooking and Dominic Moll's Harry's He's Here to Help.

Excerpt from "This Is London":
Hotly anticipated is Kate Winslet's appearance in Quills, Philip Kaufman's sumptuous period piece about the Marquis de Sade during his imprisonment in a Paris lunatic asylum in 1807. The script requires Miss Winslet to appear in various states of undress as a laundry maid who is also muse to Geoffrey Rush's de Sade.


About the London FF:

The London Film Festival is presented by the British Film Institute and is non-competitive. Its objective is the promotion of cinematographic art by presenting films of quality.

For two weeks in November, the heart of London quickens with the sights and sounds of the London Film Festival. If film is your passion, this is the place to be. During the festival fortnight, more than 150 movies and 75 short films, encompassing the best of world cinema, are screened at the bfi's National Film Theatre, the Odeon West End in Leicester Square, and other venues across the capital. This is a festival for audiences. Every night's a first night, with previews and premieres or gala performances, where the film-makers come to present their movies in person.

The London Film Festival is open to the public. A substantial number of accredited national and international press, TV and film buyers and distributors also participate.


Quills played at the Odeon West End 2 on Friday, November 3 at 8:45 PM.
3- Odeon West End
Leicester Square WC2
TUBE: Leicester Square

Box Office Phone:
020 7928 3232


The London Film Festival is presented by --








  
Coverage of the premiere in London November 3rd:
  
November 6: From BBC Radio -- "Kate Winslet's Baby Buzz" (found by Janalynn)
Kate Winslet made her first public appearance after the birth of her baby girl, Mia, this weekend. She was at the London premiere of her new movie, 'Quills' and, like Madonna, she's made a quick recovery after the birth. Kate told Radio 1 she's loving being a mum: "I'm on a buzz, an emotional buzz at the moment. Everything is just completely amazing, and motherhood is overwhelming. At first the nappy changes take half an hour, because you're so convinced you are going to break the baby, and now they take 30 seconds!"
  
November 6: From BBC Movie News:
Michael Caine, Kate Winslet, Geoffrey Rush, Joaquin Phoenix, and director Philip Kaufman ("The Right Stuff", "The Unbearable Lightness of Being") all attended tonight's gala screening of "Quills" at the Odeon West End. We took our place amongst the largest press turnout of the festival so far, and interviewed each in turn for our video diaries. The film is an adaptation of Doug Wright's play based on the life and work of the Marquis de Sade. Geoffrey Rush, who won an Oscar for his performance in "Shine" is simply outstanding as the mad, bad, and dangerous to know Marquis.
Following are transcripts of interviews; go to BBC OnlineBBC to listen!
Kate: "It really shocked me when I read the script, and that was why I wanted to do the film, because it was daring and brave. And I think it was a lot of things that films aren't really prepared to sort of feel, to  say these days, and it was for those reasons that I wanted the challenge. And I do think that it is shocking and I do think that it is outrageous, but it's entertaining and it's funny at the same time. And it's a great story. I mean, it's just a fantastic story. Yeah, I mean, nude scenes are always difficult. I mean, I think the good thing about the nudity involved in Quills is that there's one nude scene that I have to be involved in, and it's not a sort of pornographic Marquis de Sade-type scene. And I think that's what people would expect. It's a very loving, beautiful scene between myself and Joaquin Phoenix, and, you know, we tried to laugh as much as we could, and got through it, and we were pleased with the end result."
Michael Caine: "I like to do something different in every movie I do. And I'd just done the doctor in 'Cider House Rules', and that was one of the nicest men I've ever played. And I went straight from that to, really, the nastiest man I've ever played, ever. He's not disgusting, he's just villainous. He is a man…you always meet people who are absolutely single-minded with purpose, which he is, and they have no regard for other people whatsoever. He was told by Napoleon to go and destroy de Sade, and he did. And I thought the writer had done a very good job on that, that kind of man. The only problem with an actor is that this man is so villainous, there's no relieving factor in him. You know, so I pushed the villainy, hoping that the extreme of it would be the relief. You know, usually you can get a couple of laughs, but you can't get any laughs out of Royer-Collard at all.  I think it pushes the boundaries of common sense and wakes people up. I mean, even now, these political people in America who are about to be elected, part of their political platform is to censor Hollywood. So, we're not even talking about yesterday, we're talking about tomorrow. Oh, I think I couldn't have done that [play the Marquis], I couldn't have done that. I don't care, you could have paid me $20 million, I couldn't have played that part. And I don't think anyone could play it as well as he did. And his take on, to play the Marquis de Sade, as someone who is also a comical figure, and funny, is an extraordinary choice for an actor, and a very brave one. And I've seen the picture already, anyway, very successful one."
Director Philip Kaufman: "And then one day, lo and behold, a brown paper wrapper arrived at my doorstep, and inside was something called 'Quills', that they had developed from Doug Wright's Obie Award-winning play. And I am very happy with the film, actually. You know, when I first read Doug Wright's script in its early version, I just sat there sort of stunned after reading it. You know, I could still hear the screams echoing, I could hear the laughter. You know, it's the kind of film I like most because it's a mixture of comedy, tragedy, and it, you know, it's got very strong parts for actors, and they dance around each other. And you're so blessed to have such great actors, not only, the, you know, leading actors, but every bit part was thrilling for me. You know, it was the happiest experience I've ever had, really, making a film. But, I mean, you know, we're not as shocking as some of the things people are watching in their hotel rooms. I mean, we're talking about the most extreme writer. His writing is very bizarre, and we're talking, you know, in ways about the creative urge and what is the question? How far do you allow a writer to go?"
Writer Doug Wright: "A very mischievous friend gave me a biography of the Marquis de Sade as a Christmas gift, and I devoured it in almost a single sitting. And that led me to read his work, which I found the most incendiary, provocative material I'd ever read in my life, and it challenged me to my very core. So, I thought, if it could unnerve me so much, perhaps it would be a fruitful subject for drama, and I began to write the play. I'm delighted. I think our stellar cast and Phil's extraordinarily inventive direction have utterly served the script, and I feel like it's the dream adaptation of my play. I think it will intrigue, and titillate, and amuse people. I think you're terribly sophisticated audiences over here, so I don't know if I have any enormous shocks up my sleeve, but I trust that it will engage them in important discussion about the nature of art and its function in culture. I think every writer that has written about de Sade has appropriated him and invented the character anew. So, I think that Geoffrey takes de Sade I created and makes him the most remarkable, the most persuasive, and the most compelling invention that I ever imagined. He more than fulfills the role, he really catapults it, and so it was a thrill to work with him."
Amelia Warner: "I was working with Michael Caine in a kind of awe. I'd just be like,  'oh, my God'. But, I mean, I kind of knew who he was, but I didn't, really, so I remember my friends kind of just shouting at me, 'you've got get Get Carter, and Alfie and The Italian Job,' and sat me down and made me watch them. So, once I'd seen those, I was kind of like, 'oh, my God.' Then, I got really scared. But, I mean, it's not, you know, it's not scary. They're all so approachable and friendly, it was just fine. It's a very shocking script, you know. There are so many bits in it that are just kind of awful and horrible, but… And I was scared, actually, that it would kind of get watered down in the editing, 'cause it often happens that way. But, I mean, it hasn't at all. It's still really hard-hitting and really, you know, it's a really kind of shocking film, but, I mean, that's good because it's based on truth. I read the script and I was working on it, and I was too young to go and see it, so, yeah, that is quite weird. I hate seeing myself, it's horrible, especially on a big screen, 'cause you're just kind of like, you know, your nostril is that big and it's, like, horrible, but, no, there's nothing I'm kind of ashamed of. I'm quite, I'm pleased with it."

  
November 4: From Sky News:
"Kate's Great - Despite Missing Mia"
    Kate Winslet braved the cold to make her first public appearance since the birth of her daughter. The star thrilled crowds at the premiere of Quills, the latest movie to take centre stage within the London Film Festival. Yet wearing a black top and trousers and floor length satin jacket, she admitted it was a wrench to leave Mia behind - and confessed she was taking seven months off to spend time with her.
'Children most important thing'  -- She said: "It's horrible, really awful, she is back at the hotel with her daddy. Motherhood will always come first. Children are the most important thing to me. It's just not about being a famous actor. It's about privacy and my own life - and now Mia."
    Winslet was joined by co-stars Michael Caine and Joaquin Phoenix, who larked about for the scores of gathered fans. Quills, directed by Philip Kaufman, is based on the life of the notorious Marquis de Sade, and is already attracting talk of Oscar nominations next spring. The 25-year-old Titanic star plays Madeline LeCrec, who smuggles the Marquis de Sade's last writings out of a mental asylum.
Winslet gave birth to Mia last month at a London hospital. She married husband Jim Threapleton nearly two years ago in Oxfordshire.
    The London Film Festival has had a great start with British premieres for Cameron Crowe's much-hyped Almost Famous and the latest Merchant Ivory offering, The Golden Bowl.

  
November 4: The Sun (UK tabloid) carried this item today:
"Star Kate's Gone Totless"
    Kate Winslet went totless at a film premiere last night - by turning up without her new baby Mia.
Kate, 25, told fans it felt "really horrible" leaving Mia behind. Her trip to a screening of her new movie Quills was her first public outing since the birth. Co-stars Michael Caine and Joaquin Phoenix joined Kate at the West End premiere.

  
November 4: From ITN News:
"New Mum Kate Winslet Steps Out"
    New mum Kate Winslet was all smiles when she made her first public appearance since the birth of her daughter - but said she hated having to leave baby Mia at home. The Titanic star was in London's West End for the premiere of her new movie Quills.  Her smile was beaming as she arrived at the Odeon West End in Leicester Square wearing a black top and trousers and floor length satin jacket. But she said it was "horrible being parted" from little Mia, who was born just three weeks ago and who was being looked after by her father, film director Jim Threapleton.
"It's horrible, really awful, she is back at the hotel with her daddy," Winslet said. While she enjoyed working on the film she now intended to take seven months off to spend some time with her husband and new born child. "Motherhood will always come first," she said. In the film, about the Marquis de Sade, Winslet plays a chambermaid.
    Quills also stars Sir Michael Caine and Geoffrey Rush and was directed by Philip Kaufman. Sir Michael said he had very much enjoyed working on the rather "dark" movie. It also stars the brother of River Phoenix, Joaquin Phoenix, who said it was a "real honour" to work with such a distinguished actor as Sir Michael.
    The premiere was screened as part of the 44th London Film Festival.

  
November 4: From Yahoo! News:
"Kate Winslet tells of her changing priorities"
    LONDON (Reuters) - Actress Kate Winslet, star of the international blockbuster "The Titanic", has made her first public appearance since the birth of her daughter Mia three weeks ago. The 25-year-old star, who is married to film worker Jim Threapleton, 26, was attending the premier of her latest film Quills at a London theatre.
    Winslet told Sky News that her daughter would always come first. "Children are the most important thing to me," she said. "It's not about being a famous actor, it's not about working all the time -- to me it's always been about privacy and my own life and now especially having Mia that's the most important thing and that should always come first. Winslet is taking a seven-month break from her acting career to be with her baby.
    Quills, which also stars Geoffrey Rush and Michael Caine, is based on the final years of the Marquis de Sade, when he was imprisoned in a lunatic asylum for writing about sexual perversion and torture. Winslet plays a maid who helps smuggle de Sade's writings out of the asylum.
    On Friday, Winslet said Mia had inherited her eyes and nose. "The rest of her is Jim -- her eyes and her expressions are very definitely Jim's," she told the Daily Mail. "She's gorgeous. It's the most amazing thing. Before it was just Jim and me and now it's Jim, me and Mia and it feels the most natural thing in the world -- the perfect family."

  
November 4: More on Kate at the Quills premiere in the UK Times today:
"Winslet's Best Role is Being a Mother," by Elizabeth Judge
    Kate Winslet, the actress, arrived at the premiere for her new film last night and confirmed the latest fashion for Hollywood actresses - motherhood. Making her first public appearance since the birth of her daughter, Mia, Winslet, star of the film Titanic, said that she did not like being parted from her child. "It's horrible, really awful, she is back at the hotel with her Daddy," she said.
    In Quills Winslet plays a maid who helps to smuggle the Marquis de Sade's erotic literature out of an asylum. It also stars Sir Michael Caine as a doctor and Geoffrey Rush as the marquis. Winslet said that although she enjoyed filming, motherhood would always come first. She intends to take seven months off to spend time with her husband, the film director Jim Threapleton, and their daughter.

  
November 3: From Ananova News:
     New mum Kate Winslet was all smiles as she made her first public appearance since the birth of her daughter - but she said she hated having to leave baby Mia at home. The Titanic star was in London's West End for the premiere of her new movie Quills.
    Her smile was beaming as she arrived at the Odeon West End in Leicester Square wearing a black top and trousers and floor length satin jacket.But it was "horrible being parted" from little Mia, who was born just three weeks ago and who was being looked after by her father, film director Jim Threapleton. "It's horrible, really awful, she is back at the hotel with her daddy," Winslet said.
    While she enjoyed working on the film she now intended to take seven months off to spend some time with her husband and new born child. "Motherhood will always come first," she said.
    In the film about the Marquis de Sade, which was being screened as part of the 44th London Film Festival, Winslet plays a chambermaid. Quills also stars Sir Michael Caine and Geoffrey Rush and was directed by Philip Kaufman. Sir Michael said he had very much enjoyed working on the rather "dark" movie. It also stars Joaquin Phoenix, who said it was a "real honour" to work with such a distinguished actor as Sir Michael.